8 thoughts on “The Daily Rios 06.25.13: Top 5

  1. Pete, I am a little confused. The tone is almost like you are mad at these people because mainstream media tends to pick them for comment on comics related issues. I listen to a lot of Kevin Smith’s podcasts including the comics-centric “Fatman on Batman”. He never presents himself as the spokesman for all geeks or the most knowledgeable comics fan. He’ll be the first to admit his shortcomings in getting things out on time with his writing. I know you didn’t listen to Patton Oswalt’s diatribe with the melding of universes; and I haven’t read the posts you read commenting on it; but it wasn’t Patton suggesting an actual movie. This was a scene from his guest appearance on Parks and Rec. He was playing a character who was creating a filibuster in a local government’s legislative session. His character treated everything to an extreme. This was what was funny. Add that to the rumor that he improvised the entire speech and it’s especially funny for someone who understands what he’s talking about and the absurdity of what he’s suggesting. The clip I know of that was being passed around was a much longer cut of his filibuster than the one that aired on the show. It had me in stitches! So unless you know something else about why these (and honestly some of the other) people you chose are being held up as the spokespeople for geeks; maybe your anger is misplaced. Maybe you should be listing the 5 media outlets that continue to go to the same people for comment on comics related stories and (bring me solutions) suggest a different way.

    1. Hey Shawn! The end of the ep wraps it up – and I talk more about it on Wed and Thursday of this same week as well. Hopefully that clears it up!

  2. YES! Someone finally takes that Nerdist asshole to task. What a smug d-bag. If I have to hear him talk about what a BIG DOCTOR WHO FAN he is… Ugh.

    I’m right there with you about Smith and Oswalt, too, especially after Oswalt published that stupid “geek manifesto” about how “geeky” things becoming mainstream makes them less special. Get off it.

    I’d also have added Wil Wheaton. That guy’s turned into the biggest bully on the internet.

    1. Some of it has to do WHY media/fans are attracted to certain personalities. That attraction isn’t enough for me. Hardwick basically created a persona and just made a claim of his nerdism, Kevin Smith is looked at like he’s the stereotypical Comic Book Guy come to life, etc. With Wil, we basically watched him grow up in all of his geekiness because of Star Trek. There’s something a bit more organic and real for me in the relationship with his “personality”.

  3. Pete,

    You’re on fire this week, sir. Feels like CGS #700, boo-yah!

    But seriously, your point – especially as expanded on the New Comics Wednesday episode this week – is spot on. It’s that assumption that you like A, so you must like B that can be a bit grating. And this seems to be exacerbated within geekdom – not sure if that’s due to the passion and relatively niche audience that makes up this area of fandom or just the fact that I am ensconced within its bounds.

    I love Star Wars, comic books, Batman: the Brave and the Bold cartoons, the original Star Trek, Tolkien, X-Files.
    Conversely, I have very little exposure to Joss Whedon, have only gotten through half of LOST, have never cared for Dr. Who, generally don’t care for X-Men (and have trouble calling Claremont a good writer – the ideas are there but the execution leaves me wanting), and haven’t seen a superhero film since Iron Man & Dark Knight in 2008.

    And, to get to my main point, this often manifests itself in conversation – whether actual conversations or twitter/FB ones – wherein I will try to head off any vitriol, when admitting to either not liking or not having experienced a “geek pillar,” with the phrase “bows head in shame…” or something to that effect. Not that I really believe I should hold my head in shame because I haven’t watched Serenity or Fringe or whatever. But I obviously know that people may react with surprise, tinged with condescension, and I use that phrase as a defense mechanism. Which is something I should stop.

    -chris

    1. I’ve come across that condescension as well. But mostly it’s people who just want you to share with them. I get that. Some of it is a compliment as well – maybe they think we’ll like certain things because we tend to recognize good work. I haven’t seen Fringe, read or watched Game of Thrones, have yet to sit through any Dr. Who even as a kid, haven’t seen any Star Wars Clone Wars, etc. But that doesn’t mean I’m not a geek. I’m a geek because of the things i DO like, not because of the things I don’t like or haven’t consumed.

  4. I felt myself agreeing a lot. I never completely understood the notion of people putting them up there. I never really heard of Kevin Smith until his comic work. My friends never mentioned him either. I was baffled when I found out about this popularity.
    I never really called myself a geek/nerd or anything like that. I just happen to read comics and the blow back I get from that is always surprising. The most I’ve probably done is made a joke about “geek cred”. There’s so many famous movies and things I should have seen or read if I was going for credibility.
    I was never much of a Starwars fan and it took me awhile to get into Star Trek. I’ve had people recommend Big Bang Theory to me because of the geek references. That’s not a selling point. I do and watch other things. I’d rather fit in a TV show like The Shield.

  5. And to add all that – we are geeks in one way or another: follow sports and participate in Fantasy leagues or wear your team jersey? You’re a geek. Into food and watch reality and tv shows on food and find new restaurants every week? You’re a geek. Into Civil War memorabilia and visit sites and go to conferences and read tons of books on the matter? You’re a geek. It’s all in how you are perceived I suppose.

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